Nov

05

yes please – brand new

Introducing West Elm Market

The past few years has seen a flurry of brand offshoots moving into the natural and garden markets: Anthropologie’s TerrainWilliam-Sonoma’s Agrarian – speaking to our growing desire to get back to the basics, to get our hands dirty, and to grow and make our own… in style.

The latest is West Elm’s newly launched Market. And a welcome addition it is. Speaking to the home and garden, Market offers “solutions for everyday living” with a beautifully curated collection for kitchen, laundry, garden, workshop, and body. Here are some of my favorites:

KITCHEN:

Italla Stock Pot  |   Raw Wood Boards  |  Damascus Steel Knife Collection

CARE + REPAIR:

Heirloom Scissors  |  Heritage Leather Reinforced Mason Bag  |  Slack Dust Mop Co. Hand Duster

GARDEN:

Patterned Garden Tool Set  |  Iris Speckled Planters  |  Hanging Bag Planter

PERSONAL CARE:

Swedish Dream Sea Salt Soap  |  Canvas Dopp Kit  |  Sam’s Natural Hand + Repair Lotion

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Nov

28

tiny winter wonderland

Tiny gardens have always fascinated me, ever since I was a little girl. I used to sit in the forest looking into the mosses and imagine other worlds existing in miniature, especially under the mosses that look like little trees. Perhaps that’s why terrariums are so intriguing to me, they cultivate not only that which I put inside, but my own wonder and imagination – something which I have clung to fiercely over the years… especially at this time of the year.

Thus, I was so excited to see that Terrain is offering products for holiday terrariums this season – from the coolest containers and accessories to the sweetest little decorations. You can make your own tiny winter wonderland.

 

For a more traditionally terrariumed approach, from left to right: the Hanging Paned Terrarium, the Tall Hanging Atrium Terrarium, and the Conservatory Terrarium.

For a more modern look, from left to right: the Bottle Neck Terrarium (love it) and the Hand Blown Terrarium – hand blown in Poland.

And for the accoutrements, from left to right: Okubo Shears from Japan, Terrain’s Woodland Terrarium Kit which has sold out since I started writing this post (but even better I found this place that will send live moss and lichen assortments from the forest floor in Idaho), and the Plant Mister.

Next come the rocks, from left to right: Jade River Stones, Tan River Stones, and Ocean Stones… And if you like rocks you should look here, here, and here.

And lastly, heh, we have the Bottlebrush and Bristle Brush decorations, from left to right: the Snowy Bottlebrush Trees (with red berries), the Bristle Brush Fox Ornament (love him), the Bristle Brush Robin Ornament, the Perched Owl Ornament, the Bristle Brush Cardinal Ornament, and the Bottlebrush Evergreens.

So if you have not yet had a go at terrariums I suggest you give it a try and create your own little world. Here are some instructions that will help you get started.

Image courtesy of pinterest.

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Feb

01

getting fresh – air plants

 

Air plants truly are a miraculous and mysterious group of plants. Intriguing to look at, their architectural and slightly eerie forms add a touch of green that is reminiscent of the sea and its creatures. Air plants, or Tillandsia, got their name because they don’t require soil to grow. Instead, in nature, they live on other things – plants, rocks, and trees – for their support, and they gather their nutrients and water from the air. Spanish moss, which hangs from the trees in the southeastern United States is a member of this group.
Their habits not only make them unusual and interesting, but make them extremely easy to care for. As they do not need to be planted, they can live on or in virtually anything and need only moderate light and a soak in water once a week.

 

If you want to create your own terrarium or interior scape you can order air plants, such as the above varieties, from the Air Plant Supply Co. So easy to care for, they are essentially foolproof, and as they are also so inexpensive, they are well worth a try. Terrain has some really great options for containers, shown below, both hanging or for a table. But one of the best things about air plants is that they don’t need a container at all! Put them on a piece of slate on your shelf or windowsill, or put some twigs in a vase and hang the air plants on the branches.

 

 

If you’d rather have something a little more ready made check out the great creations below from Tortoise Loves Donkey. Delivered right to your door, they make easy easier.
Images 1 & 2 courtesy of Apartment Therapy.
Image 3 courtesy of Curbly.
Image 4 courtesy of Cubeme.
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Jan

12

string gardens

I am so in love with these string gardens! Created by the eponymous String Gardens in the Netherlands, they show the element itself in all its beauty, unfettered by containers.
I love designs that celebrate uncommon and nontraditional elements. A number of years ago, in the winter, when I was working as a floral designer, we gathered little evergreen trees from the snowy forest floor, pulling them up roots and all. We washed the soil from the root balls and put them in glass vases, the beauty and intrigue of the roots became the focus.
This would be a great application for orchids. Thank you to apartment therapy for showing these to me!

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